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If you have never gardened before, now is the perfect time to start. Digging in the dirt is a fantastic way to de-stress and connect with nature, and a fun way to exercise! There is nothing more rewarding than strolling through your garden and picking vine-ripened tomatoes and cucumbers to toss into a crisp salad!

Parsley Microgreens - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Microgreens are relatively new and were first introduced in the 1980’s in upscale California restaurants to add fresh taste and stunning beauty to traditional cuisine. Once a novelty, they have steadily been growing in popularity. Even though small in size, they are chock full of nutrients, often containing more density of vitamins and minerals than larger and more mature vegetable greens. These aromatic greens are actually baby plants that have been harvested 7-21 days after sprouting, when they reach 1-3 inches tall.

Getting your Garden Ready for Winter - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

When the dreary days of Winter start to get to you, don’t forget you can start planning for next year to help look forward to warmer weather, fresh air, and the joys of gardening. – St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Now is the time when heirloom gardeners start getting their vegetable gardens ready for Winter. This is not just the end of this season, it is a time to lay the ground work for a good start to next year’s successful heirloom garden! New gardeners among us will wonder what they need to do to finish things off when their harvest is complete for the season.

Once you have picked all the heirloom produce that’s left in your garden, get things wound down for the year by cleaning up the beds. Taking time in the Fall to clean up a bit, makes getting the garden ready in the Spring a whole lot easier, and kicks things off to a good start next year.

This article is on how Heirloom Seeds can help you, and those around you survive an economic collapse.

  • Ensuring your own food supply.
  • Camouflage Gardening
  • Bartering with Heirloom Seeds.
  • Bartering with the vegetables produced in your own garden.
  • Barter Heirloom Seeds Collection

Many people are concerned about the possibility of collapse of the economy or the U.S. Dollar, and rightly so. With all the triggers in the world and the 20 trillion in US debt, the odds are in the favor of a collapse.  Many experts have been warning of the likelihood of a collapse in recent times, and things only seem to get closer and closer. After a collapse of the dollar, its value would soon be worthless.  In a very short time, we would see the price of everyday things go up dramatically, and this would eventually lead to a subsistence crises which is a lack of food, and essential resources. There would be empty store shelves  because it would be too expensive to buy or transport food into the stores, the whole economy would come to  a grinding halt. This scenario we have seen played out throughout past months in present day Venezuela.

Water early or use soaker hoses.

“Water in the morning” This is one of those old tried-and-true bits of advice that many think is just an old wives’ tale, but really, it makes sense. Many fungal diseases need damp, cool environments to thrive. So if our plants’ foliage is wet overnight, that gives these diseases very favorable environment in our garden. The easiest way to prevent this is to water as early in the day as possible, so that your plants can dry off before nightfall. Bottom watering with soaker hoses eliminates this issue. Yes rain will get on the leaves, but adding our own water to the plants and leaves only perpetuates the problem.

Keep Diseases at Bay: Allow the soil to warm before planting, letting the sun destroy fungal diseases before you start for the year.

Preventing Disease Part 2 - Keep Diseases at Bay - St. Clare Heirloom SeedsKeep diseases at bay: Some fungal diseases get a head start in our gardens because we plant when the soil is still too cool. Our plants are stressed, just trying to get a start in cooler than their ideal temperatures, putting more energy into just trying to survive, which makes them less able to fight of diseases, and before we know it, we’re dealing with sick plants. The easiest way to eliminate this problem is to allow the soil to warm and ensure that you’re not planting to early in the spring.

Preventing disease is much easier than treatment.

Powdery mildew on tomatoes - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Three leaves infected with with powdery mildew showing different signs and symptoms. – St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Preventing disease in your heirloom vegetable garden is much easier than treatment. Isn’t this the truth in so many things? The old adage “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” rings true in the garden, too. Treating a problem with plant disease is much harder than taking some precautionary steps ahead of time. And, if you wait until it’s too late, you may lose the battle and all your hard work will be lost.

Organic Gardening Part 6: Crop Rotation - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Crop rotation is part of building healthy soil which is an ongoing process, one to work at each garden season. – St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Interesting fact: George Washington Carver was a major pioneer in teaching of crop rotation, a big help in replenishing soil, rejuvenating the yields and success in farming.

Crop rotation is a systematic approach to deciding which crop to plant where in your vegetable garden from one year to the next. It  is as important a factor in soil health as amendments, and reduces the amount of work you have to put into achieving healthy soil for your plants.

Worm Castings are an excellent organic soil amendment, hard to Worm Castings - St. Clare Heirloom Seedsfind in retail stores, but a great addition to your soil. The nice thing is, you can order them by mail.
An amazing fact about worm castings: God in His infinitely awesome abilities in creation made worms to produce organic fertilizer. Even if what they take in for food has any chemicals or such, it comes out the other end organic, filtered by their amazing digestive system. They have been lab tested over and over, and this is how they always come out, pure and 100% organic.

“Start at the very beginning, a very good place to start”

Few of us start with good soil, but we can all build it. Turning poor soil into plant-friendly soil is not difficult to do, once you understand the components of healthy soil. Using gardening methods which improve rather than hurt the soil play a huge part in successful gardening.

Control weeds!

There are simple, organic methods to reduce your work here, too.
Weeds steal nutrients from your plants, reducing their vigor. The age-old practice of cultivating between plants with a hoe, not only suppresses weeds, but aerates your soil, too. A good workout in the garden on your knees pulling weeds, or wielding a hoe is healthy for you, and your garden, too. But, what if your health isn’t able to keep up with the weeding, what if you are strapped for time, and always get behind on the weeding?

Learn your insects: Get rid of the bad, not the beneficials.

Learn your insects! Organic gardening doesn’t mean you have to Learn your insect - Assassin bug - St. Clare Heirloom Seedsshare your harvest with the bugs, but you will probably have less than pristine looking plants and produce. Since  in organic gardening you are trying to garden in cooperation with nature, sometimes you have to accept the occasional pest in the garden, not taking the typical line of attack that has been popular in recent generations of grabbing the nearest pesticide. Your first line of defense should be vigilance. Inspect your plants regularly for signs of a problem and take organic methods of action quickly. Keep in mind, though, not every insect is a foe and that action doesn’t necessarily mean pesticide. Just picking bugs and eggs off plants and putting them in a bucket of soapy water is frequently a first step for organic gardeners. Learn which are the beneficial insects and keep them around, they will help do your work for you, getting rid of pests.

Organic Gardening:
The basic “Why’s” and “How’s” of growing organic.

Organic Gardening can yield a lot of produce plus the peace of mind of being chemical free. - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Organic Gardening can yield a lot of produce plus the peace of mind of being chemical free. – St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Organic gardening was for a while seen as something only the super health-nuts or hippies did. But, not so anymore, we are all becoming aware that the methods of gardening with chemicals that have become popular in recent generations are no healthier than the awful stuff called margarine. The more research that has come out showing the terrible side effects of synthetic fertilizers and the chemicals in commercial pesticides and herbicides, the more we realize, the hippies had something there! Funny thing, though, organic gardening is really not so recent as all that. Thousands of years of gardeners before us grew only with organic methods.  Here we’ll delve a bit into the whys of going organic, and a couple starting points to begin with if you aren’t already on the bandwagon.

What advantages do they have over hybrids?

Heirloom Squash varieties in fall setting. - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Heirloom Squash come in hundreds of varieties; big, small, long, skinny, blue, yellow, tan, peach, black, brown. Try a new variety of heirloom squash this year. – St. Clare Heirloom Seeds.

Flavor, flavor, flavor! One of the first reasons people grow open-pollinated or heirloom seeds is the flavor. Hybrids are bred for many characteristics such as uniformity (in shape or harvest time), high yields, withstanding rigors of transport, etc. But, sadly in the breeding process the desirable characteristics like flavor and nutritional value suffer. There’s truly nothing as delicious as a sun-ripened home-grown heirloom tomato. You tomato lovers out there know just what I mean when I say we suffer each winter, waiting for the first delicious tomatoes of the next garden season. 🙂

Posted by in Canning and Preserving, Tomato on February 22, 2016

Heirloom Non GMO Scarlet Nantes Carrots - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Question: I am looking at starting my garden and collection of Heirloom Non-GMO Seeds but want to ensure they are Non-GMO and Heirloom. In looking through your seeds for sale, some specifically say that and others do not. Are ALL of the seeds Heirloom Non-GMO seeds or only the seeds labeled that way in the description?

Posted by in Canning and Preserving on February 3, 2016
Easy Peel Heirloom Tomatoes - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Nothing tastes quite as good as you own homemade spaghetti sauce, made from your own heirloom tomatoes, in the middle of winter.

The canning season may be over for most of us gardeners but we are excited about this tip that we discovered through a customer inquiry. We have always gone with the “blanch and peel” method of peeling tomatoes for canning, a messy and at times difficult method, but it works. However, when a customer asked us if we had a better method we thought we’d go looking and see what we could find. Our new favorite method: Gas-Flame Peeling! For more info on Easy Peel Tomatoes and other methods of peeling your favorite heirloom tomatoes click on over to http://www.wikihow.com/Peel-Tomatoes.

Companion planting in your Heirloom / Open Pollinated vegetable garden can be a great asset when it comes to gardening. Whether the pairing has been confirmed by research studies or is simply part of companion planting tradition we’re not sure, but this list is some of what we could find. Here are some companion plantings you may want to try, with information on the type of interaction.
Soil Temperature Conditions for Vegetable Seed Germination - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds
Crops

 

Asparagus
Beans, Lima
Beans, Snap
Beets
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Lettuce
Muskmelons
Okra
Onions
Parsley
Parsnips
Peas
Peppers
Pumpkins
Radishes
Spinach
Squash
Swiss Chard
Tomatoes
Turnips
Watermelons

Minimum (° F)

 

50
60
60
40
40
40
40
40
50
60
60
35
60
60
35
40
35
40
60
60
40
35
60
40
50
40
60

Optimum Range (° F)

 

60-85
65-85
65-85
50-85
45-95
45-85
45-85
60-70
60-95
65-95
75-90
40-80
75-95
70-95
50-95
50-85
50-70
40-75
65-95
70-95
45-90
45-75
70-95
50-85
60-85
60-105
70-95

Optimum (° F)

 

75
85
80
85
85
80
80
70
95
95
85
75
90
95
75
75
65
75
85
95
85
70
95
85
85
85
95

Maximum (° F)

 

95
85
95
95
100
95
100
85
105
105
95
85
100
105
95
90
85
85
95
100
95
85
100
95
95
105
105

Planning for Planting

by Becky Crouse

Whether you are an experienced Open Pollinated / Heirloom vegetable gardener or you have finally decided that you are ready to graduate from window boxes, planting a vegetable garden requires planning. A properly planned and planted vegetable garden will naturally resist disease, deter insect pests, and be healthy and hardy. With the spring planting season fast approaching, winter is the ideal time to get started.

Posted by in Gardening on January 19, 2016
By the Soil Conservation Service

Does rainwater from your neighbor’s property drain onto your Heirloom / Open Pollinated vegetable garden? Is your Heirloom / Open Pollinated Vegetable garden on a slope so that water rushes off and is lost to the vegetable plants, taking soil with it? Is your Heirloom / Open Pollinated vegetable garden on a steep slope where you want to plant perennials, shrubs, or azaleas? If so, you should think seriously of planting on the contour or perhaps building a terrace.

Gary Vallad and Amanda Gevens
University Florida Ext.

Introduction

Organic Management of Vegetable Diseases Part II - St. Clare Heirloom SeedsThe successful management of both soil borne and foliar diseases requires a multifaceted program, taking into consideration variety selection, cultural methods, biological’s, and chemical applications approved by the Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) and certified organic under the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Organic Program (NOP). This review emphasizes the management of foliar disease and serves as a guide to assist growers in selecting strategies to manage disease in a sustainable system.

Gary Vallad and Amanda Gevens
University Florida Ext.

Most methods of plant-disease control follow one of the six principles summarized by the acronym REPEAT: Resistance, Eradication; Protection, Exclusion, Avoidance, and Therapy. The following is an overview of these principles with an emphasis on methods acceptable in certified organic vegetable production for controlling plant disease caused by soilborne pathogens.

Jill Samuelson and Dan Drost
Utah State University

New Zealand Spinach - St Clare Heirloom SeedsOpen Pollinated / Heirloom New Zealand spinach is a warm season alternative to regular spinach that does well in hot, dry conditions. Soak seeds in water for 24 hours prior to planting to hasten germination. Seeds should not be planted directly outside until after the last frost date, or start transplants inside 3-4 weeks prior to the last frost. Plant seeds ½ inch deep in loose, fertile soil that has had organic matter incorporated prior to planting. Space plants 3 feet between rows, and every 12 inches after thinning within rows. Although Open Pollinated / Heirloom New Zealand spinach is drought tolerant, water consistently for the best flavor. Fertilize frequently with a high nitrogen fertilizer. Mulches and row covers can help in starting plants outside earlier. Mulches also help with weed control and retaining soil moisture. Leaves should be harvested frequently to encourage new, lush growth. Cut the tips and eat raw or cooked.

Danielle D. Treadwell and Mickie E. Swisher
Florida State University
IFAS Extension
Certified Organic Non-GMO Heirloom seeds - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Organic certification addresses a growing worldwide demand for organic seeds.

Organic food and other organically produced products are available to consumers in a variety of retail outlets, and the quantity and diversity of organic food and other organically produced products increases every year. The information that appears on an organic label is variable and depends on the percent of certified ingredients, as well as the manufacturer’s or supplier’s desire to advertise the product as organic. Thus, organic product labels can be difficult for consumers to interpret. In addition, many consumers lack a clear understanding of the regulatory significance of products bearing the United States Department of Agriculture’s “USDA Organic” label.

Romy Krueger and Robert McSorley
Florida State University
IFAS Extension

Nematode Management

Nematodes are usually microscopic in size and are classified as unsegmented worms, belonging to the Phylum Nematoda. Plant-parasitic nematodes are a concern for growers of agricultural or Open Pollinated / Heirloom vegetable garden crops. These plant-parasitic nematodes will mainly feed on the roots of plants. A few kinds will feed on foliage but this not common. Many other kinds of nematodes are present in the soil as well. These include decomposers, predators, insect parasites, and animal parasites. Some nematodes are aquatic and do not affect terrestrial plants. Other nematodes act as decomposers, predators, and insect parasites. In farming systems, nematode predators and parasites of insects are beneficial, while nematode parasites of animals and plants are considered pests in agriculture. Beneficial nematodes that

By Allan Stoner

Open Pollinated / Heirloom Tomatoes are one of the most popular vegetables grown in home gardens. Open Pollinated / Heirloom Tomatoes grow under a wide variety of conditions with a minimum of effort, and they require relatively little space for a large production. Of tropical American origin, tomatoes do not thrive in very cool weather. They are suited to spring, summer, and autumn culture over most of the North and upper South, and they will grow in winter in the extreme South. Each Open Pollinated / Heirloom tomato plant may be expected to yield 8 to 10 pounds of fruit. The number of tomato plants needed will depend on the size of your family. To spread the Open Pollinated / Heirloom tomato, to harvest over the growing season, stagger planting dates at 2 to 3 week intervals.

Sherman V. Thomson/Extension Plant Pathologist
Scott C. Ockey/Plant Disease Diagnostician

Blossom end rot is a non-parasitic disease affecting Open Pollinated / Heirloom tomato, pepper, and watermelon fruit. Fruits are usually affected when about one-third or more grown, but the disease can occur during any growth stage of the fruit. Losses caused by blossom end rot vary from negligible to severe.

Posted by in Plant Diseases on January 19, 2016
Sherman V. Thomson/Extension Plant Pathologist
Scott C. Ockey/Plant Disease Diagnostician

 

Powdery mildew on tomatoes - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Three leaves infected with powdery mildew showing different signs and symptoms.

Powdery mildew on Tomatoes, caused by the fungus Leveillula taurica, occurs infrequently in home gardens. However, the disease can be very devastating in commercially-grown tomatoes where yield losses may exceed 50% in heavily infected fields. The extent of loss depends on environmental conditions, date of disease onset, and effectiveness of fungicide control. Hot, dry days with an occasional rainstorm are conducive to disease development.

Elton M. Smith
Ohio State University Extension

Hot beds and cold frames are used by Heirloom / Open Pollinated vegetable gardeners for propagating vegetables for the garden. Hot beds are used for starting the Heirloom / Open Pollinated vegetable plants and cold frames for tempering or hardening vegetable plants to outdoor conditions before transplanting. For most home vegetable gardeners the same frame can serve both purposes. The principle difference between the two is that hot beds have a heat source. Traditionally, hot beds and cold frames were built even with or slightly below ground level and covered by glass sash. Present-day frames are often completely above ground and plastic covered because film is generally available at a reasonable cost.

Sally A. Miller, Richard M. Riedel, Randall C. Rowe
Ohio State University Extension

Root rots, damping-off before and after seedling emergence, and seed rots are destructive diseases of Heirloom / Open Pollinated green, snap, lima, and dry beans. These diseases are caused primarily by soil borne fungi. Significant losses may occur to susceptible varieties, especially if cool, wet weather conditions prevail for the first few weeks after vegetable seeding and then are followed by hot, dry weather. Disease incidence and severity often vary greatly, even in areas with a history of root rot. In the same Heirloom / Open Pollinated vegetable growing season, it is not uncommon to lose a Heirloom / Open Pollinated vegetable crop completely and then re-seed and experience no problems. This situation results from changes in biological, environmental, and soil conditions. Since there are no commercially acceptable resistant varieties, vegetable growers should learn how to recognize these diseases and use a combination of management practices to minimize potential losses.

A windbreak can be used to conserve soil moisture in your Open Pollinated / Heirloom vegetable garden or to keep the wind from blowing the vine plants around. Use a material that casts low shade while filtering wind is ideal. This simple version uses wood snow fencing, which is inexpensive, easy to install and remove, and may be attractive enough to leave up year-round.

Open Pollinated / Heirloom garden vegetables vary so much in their preferred growing temperatures, planting the heirloom vegetable garden isn’t a one day job. Be prepared to spend several days over the course early spring to early summer planting heirloom vegetable seeds and plants. You’ll plant cool weather crops a few weeks before the last spring frost. Set out warm weather vegetable crops just after the last spring frost. Hot weather vegetable crops cannot tolerate frost or cold soil. Unless you can protect them with a portable cold frame or row covers, plant them at least three weeks after the last spring frost. In warm climates, plant cool weather vegetable crops again in early fall so that they grow during the fall and winter. Here is a guide to the temperature preferences of 30 common heirloom garden vegetables;

Posted by in Seed Saving on January 19, 2016

Posted by in Gardening Crafts on January 19, 2016

Making a Broom Corn broom requires practice, but anyone can make one with a little bit of practice. The secret is to bind the stems together as tightly as you can, which is best done with the help of a handy doorknob. You can use a straight stick or dowel rod for the handle. Or you could even use a straight branch for your broom handle.

A scarecrow in the farmers field. - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

To build a scarecrow from scratch, you need only a few materials and a willingness to use your imagination. – St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Scarecrows have been scaring birds away, or, in some cases amusing them, for as long as man has grown crops. Some say these whimsical creatures were first used by tribes in central or northern Europe; others claim that Indians were the first to employ them. Wherever the origin, the scarecrow has been used on farms and in Open Pollinated / Heirloom vegetable gardens across the country for many years.

Henderson's Black Valentine Bush BeanHutterite Soup Bush BeanChristmas Lima BeanFordhook 242 Bush Lima BeanBrockton Horticultural Pole Bean
Phaseolus vulgaris – Leguminosae or Fabaceae (Pea Family)
Beans are a crop that grow well in warm weather, so wait until after your last frost date to plant. If the soil is too cold the bean seeds will just sit in the ground and rot. Plan an average of ten to fifteen plants per person. Cold, wet weather can bring about disease. To prevent disease don’t touch healthy Bean plants after working with diseased ones and try not to touch them when there wet. Most dried beans whether bush or semi-vining, require long growing seasons. To direct-sow them plant 1” deep and space them about 6” apart. Beans are very high in protein. Like other legumes, soybeans and cowpeas are excellent green manure crops that enrich soil with organic matter and nitrogen. Some people plant a crop of soybeans just to till them under to add organic matter to there soil.

Posted by in Gardening on January 19, 2016
Amish Paste TomatoGreen Zebra TomatoGolden Jubilee TomatoHomestead TomatoMarglobe Supreme Tomato

There are many factors along the way that can affect a heirloom tomato’s quality such as watering, fertilizing, ripeness when picking, and storage and handling factors. Two mistakes often made when heirloom tomatoes make it into the kitchen is refrigerating them or leaving them on a sunny windowsill to ripen (only tomato plants need full sun; harvested fruit does not). Both of these practices will degrade flavor.

Posted by in Worm Castings on January 11, 2016

Benefits of Worm Castings

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Our Worm Castings are Organic and Lab Tested 99% Pure!

The Benefits of Worm Castings - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Our Worm Castings are Organic and Lab Tested 99% Pure! – St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Worm castings (a.k.a. worm manure, vermicompost, or worm excreta) are rich in plant nutrients, trace minerals and growth enhancers, and incorporating castings into the soil significantly increases microbial life in the root zone. Worm castings are extremely beneficial in that they stimulate plant growth more than any other natural product, enhance the ability of your soil to retain water, and also inhibit root diseases such as root rot. The humus in worm castings removes toxins and harmful fungi and bacteria from the soil. Worm Castings therefore have the ability to fight off plant diseases.

Posted by in Worm Castings on January 8, 2016

How to use Worm Castings

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Our Worm Castings are Organic and Lab Tested 99% Pure!

New uses for worm castings are being discovered everyday. Indoors or outdoors, in the ground or in containers, earthworm castings from St. Clare Heirloom Seeds are for your entire heirloom garden.

How to use Worm Castings - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

How to use worm castings is a popular question. New uses for worm castings are being discovered everyday.

How to use Worm Castings Indoors:
Worm Castings can be added to potting soil or mixed into the soil of house plants that are existing. They can also be top dressed on household and inside plants and the nutrients will soak down thru the soil each time they get watered. Repeat every 2 – 3 months as the plants use up the nutrients.

All about Worm Castings (a.k.a. Worm Manure, Vermicompost, or Worm Excreta)

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Worm castings are the most nutrient rich fertilizer known to man. - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Worm castings are the most nutrient rich fertilizer known to man, stimulating plant growth more than any other natural product on the market. – St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Worm castings are the most nutrient rich fertilizer known to man, stimulating plant growth more than any other natural product on the market. They are 99% pure, natural, and organic, making earthworm castings one of the most highly sought after organic fertilizers today, as more people seek to grow organic and healthy plants in their gardens. Worm castings are the original natural fertilizer put in place by the Creator since the beginning of time, discovered by man to be extremely beneficial in the plant and gardening world.

Organic Management of Vegetable Diseases Part I:

Gary Vallad and Amanda Gevens
University Florida Ext.

Most methods of plant-disease control follow one of the six principles summarized by the acronym REPEAT: Resistance, Eradication; Protection, Exclusion, Avoidance, and Therapy. The following is an overview of these principles with an emphasis on methods acceptable in certified organic vegetable production for controlling plant disease caused by soilborne pathogens.

Posted by in Gardening on January 6, 2016

Garden site selection - St. Clare Heirloom SeedsSelecting a Garden Site for your
Open Pollinated / Heirloom Vegetables

A back yard or some other plot near your home in full sunlight is the most convenient Open Pollinated / Heirloom vegetable garden site. However, poor drainage, shallow soil, and shade from buildings or trees may mean your Open Pollinated / Heirloom vegetable garden must be located in an area farther from the house.

Damping Off

Damping Off of a heirloom garden seedling - St. Clare Heirloom Seeds

Damping Off is a term used for a variety of fungal problems that lead to sudden seedling death.

Damping off is a term used for a variety of fungal problems that lead to sudden seedling death. A soil-borne fungal disease that affects seeds and new seedlings, damping off usually refers to the rotting of stem and root tissues at and below the soil surface. Usually, the plants will germinate and come up fine, but within a few days they become water-soaked and mushy, fall over at the base, and die. The pathogens attack the tender stems and roots of the seedlings. Some seedlings look pinched at the base of the stem, others flop over, and some wither away entirely. Once the process is underway, its hard to save even a few of your plants. Prevention is the best cure against Damping Off.

Posted by in Plant Diseases on January 6, 2016

Bacterial Canker
a.k.a. Bacterial Blast or Bacterial Gummosis

Bacterial Canker on a tomato leaf

Bacterial Canker on a tomato leaf.

Bacterial Canker is, as stated in the title, a bacterial disease. The heirloom garden plant mainly affected by Bacterial Canker is the Tomato. It is widespread throughout the U.S.A. especially when the weather is cool, moist and windy. It is spread to heirloom garden plants by the wind, rain, infected seeds, and debris. It enters the garden plant through wounds in its skin.

Plant Diseases in the Home Heirloom / Open Pollinated Vegetable Garden

Heirloom plant diseases have been defined as a disruption in the plants ability to function as a result of continuous irritation. If you have allergy’s you have a really good idea what continuous irritation means. Diseases are caused by three types of agents: Bacteria, Fungi, and Viruses.

St. Clare Heirloom Seeds are proud signers of The Safe Seed Pledge: “Agriculture and seeds provide the basis upon which our lives depend. We must protect this foundation as a safe and genetically stable source for future generations. For the benefit of all farmers, gardeners and consumers who want an alternative, We pledge that we do not knowingly buy or sell genetically engineered seeds or plants. The mechanical transfer of genetic material outside of natural reproductive methods and between genera, families or kingdoms, poses great biological risks as well as economic, political, and cultural threats. We feel that genetically engineered varieties have been insufficiently tested prior to public release. More research and testing is necessary to further assess the potential risks of genetically engineered seeds. Further, we wish to support agricultural progress that leads to healthier soils, genetically diverse agricultural ecosystems and ultimately healthy people and communities.” ×
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